The Flowers of War (2011)

mp’s rating: 8.2/10
plot: 8.5
acting: 8
effects: 8

Having been a fan of war movies for as long as I can remember, The Flowers of War is an impeccable story, full of brutality that scars whoever who watches it, yet hopeful enough to remind us the things worth fighting for. If not forever, at least, people would remember that for the two hours of the movie.

In 1937 China, during the second Sino-Japanese war, a mortician, John (Christian Bale) arrives at a Catholic church in Nanjing to prepare a priest for burial. Upon arrival he finds himself the lone adult among a group of convent girl students and prostitutes from a nearby brothel. When he finds himself in the unwanted position of protector of both groups from the horrors of the invading Japanese army, he discovers the meaning of sacrifice and honor. Written by msmith5484

“I want to make you a promise,” John (Christian Bale) said to one of the prostitutes. First captured by her beauty, and later by her warm heart, John looked at her earnestly.

“When this war’s all over. I’ll come find you. I’ll bring you home,” he said.

The prostitute, named Yu Mo, forced a smile. “After tonight, my body is not mine anymore,” she let down a tear. “Bring me home today.”

(The quotes might not be the exact words said, as it is written from my memory.)

The Flowers of War is cruel, brutal, and yet beautiful. Your heart would cry. Bleed. When children see pain that’s reserved for a lifetime. When one readies to die not for one’s country, but for another life. When she smiled while supposed to cry. When seeing what one can do for love, honour, and dignity…

If I did not think on how I would look if my make up is smudged, I would have cried a river. Spending half of the movie biting your lips and holding on your tears was not an easy feat.

And let there be no more war.

“We were eighteen and had begun to love life and the world; and we had to shoot it to pieces. The first bomb, the first explosion, burst in our hearts. We are cut off from activity, from striving, from progress. We believe in such things no longer, we believe in the war.”

All Quiet On The Western Front, Ch. 5 by Erich Maria Remarque

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s